Викладачі

 Roger Leeds, PhD

Prior to joining the faculty of Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Professor Leeds was an international finance practitioner for 25 years, working as an investment banker at Salomon Brothers, a senior staff member of the International Finance Corporation, a partner at KPMG in charge of its global privatization practice and a managing director of a major private equity firm in New York focused on emerging markets.

Professor Leeds is the founder and first chairman of the Emerging Markets Private Equity Association. In addition to teaching at SAIS, Professor Leeds has taught at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia Business School. Professor Leeds has published extensively in his field of international finance and emerging markets investing, including two books: Private Equity Investing in Emerging Markets, Opportunities for Value Creation and Financing Small Enterprises in Developing Countries. Professor Leeds has appeared as a guest commentator on CBS, CNBC News, CNN, and NPR. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and has served on various boards and advisory committees. Professor Leeds received his Ph.D. in international relations from Johns Hopkins SAIS.

 

Stephen D. Krasner, MA, PhD

Stephen Krasner is the Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations, the Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences, School of Humanities & Sciences, and the deputy director of FSI. A former director of CDDRL, Krasner is also an FSI senior fellow, and a fellow of the Hoover Institution.

From February 2005 to April 2007 he served as the Director of Policy Planning at the US State Department. While at the State Department, Krasner was a driving force behind foreign assistance reform designed to more effectively target American foreign aid. He was also involved in activities related to the promotion of good governance and democratic institutions around the world.

At CDDRL, Krasner was the coordinator of the Program on Sovereignty. His work has dealt primarily with sovereignty, American foreign policy, and the political determinants of international economic relations. Before coming to Stanford in 1981 he taught at Harvard University and UCLA. At Stanford, he was chair of the political science department from 1984 to 1991, and he served as the editor of International Organization from 1986 to 1992.

He has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences (1987-88) and at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (2000-2001). In 2002 he served as director for governance and development at the National Security Council. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

His major publications include Defending the National Interest: Raw Materials Investment and American Foreign Policy (1978), Structural Conflict: The Third World Against Global Liberalism (1985), and Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy (1999). Publications he has edited include International Regimes (1983), Exploration and Contestation in the Study of World Politics (co-editor, 1999), Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities (2001), and Power, the State, and Sovereignty: Essays on International Relations (2009). He received a BA in history from Cornell University, an MA in international affairs from Columbia University and a PhD in political science from Harvard.